How the time passes, a new year

As I sit writing this, there are just over 8 hours until 2014 comes, a new year, which will bring new joys, new sorrows, new challenges, new adventures, new friends and hopefully much more of the same happiness I have had this year. I want to take this time to recap the year.

While most of 2013 was a blur, there are a few things that stand out.

In February I was diagnosed with a rare brain disorder that threatened to take my precious eyesite. I was diagnosed with IIH, which I have written about here, herehere, here what it feels like, and a little bit here. And while it isn’t getting better… it is only sometimes getting worse. And the best news I could hope from with this… as of right now, my eyes are safe.

Come May… my most common thought was how to make the things in my head more appealing, how can I show them off? How can I… honestly… make them LESS BORING. And I came up with magnetic decoration! I still have, and occasionally use these.  I also, was moving. I moved from my home in Colorado to my new home in Arizona at the end of May. I am still working with the same company, but have moved locations a few times.

In August I confronted a prejudice I have, when it comes to communication, visual communication actually. I will admit, and did admit, I had seen Cued Speech as a lesser form of communication, I thought it was weird, I thought it didn’t work, I thought it was… useless. I don’t think that anymore. I feel it has its uses, I feel there are times for it. And while I will not be using it as my main method of communicaiton, I have been learning it.

In October I wrote about my Left CI failing, and while it happened at the end of August, I’m not counting that as an august post. It was hard, it was annoying, but it was replaced in November, just 2 days short of my 25th Birthday.  November also was activation which went remarkably good. And I am now doing well with my implant.

This month I have written an N6 Review and I still love it. I also have been to the dentist what feels like enough to make up for the many years I went without seeing one… something I will NOT be doing again any time soon. I will be going to the dentist for my 6 month check up just as I should.

Another very exciting piece of news… my sister is getting married June 1st!!! This will mean a trip to Colorado! It will also mean I will have to wear a dress and figure out how to keep my Cis on with an up-do.

I think this is enough for now (read back if you have to) and I will try to post more often in 2014.

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A journey to cueing

I admit, in the past I have been very… biased. Mentally I looked down upon things such as SEE or Cued Speech, which are modality of English and are not full languages. I can see how each would be helpful now though. I can see how SEE can be helpful in learning the grammatical structure of English, personally it is much too slow and a little convoluted for me to use on a daily basis. Cued Speech I was also biased against. I wasn’t nice to it… I thought that it had no place, that it was forcing the oral method onto people; that it was confusing; that it was wrong. I have been forced to eat my words… it has a place, it has a time, although right now… it’s still confusing.

How the phonemes are shown

How the phonemes are shown

I started on a journey to cued speech shortly before I moved to Arizona.  I had started thinking… people tell me again and again that ASL is less, and I know differently… but then after looking at myself, I noticed, I was doing the same thing with modalities of English… I was looking at them as if they were less, as if they had no place and that the people who used them were less than I, that they couldn’t master the complexities of conceptual thinking, of visual thinking, and they were stuck in a rut… boy was I wrong.

Right before I moved, I met with Aaron, of Aaron Cues, and his wife for a short Cue lesson, to get my hands wet, and to figure out if it was something I was interested in continuing. It was exhausting… eye opening… and a lesson in eating crow. These two people could communicate easily, in real time, just as I can with ASL. I thought cueing would slow things down, I was wrong. I thought it would be confusing for a child to learn, I was wrong. I thought it would work best (like lip-reading) with some sound… I was wrong. It was lip-reading with hands. With lip-reading alone, only 30% of what is said in the English Language is shown on the lips, the rest is up to you to figure out and make sense of. With a person who is proficient at cued speech, the 8 hand shapes and 8 Locations, turn the 30% into 100%. For me… right now… it turns the 30% into about 10% because I might be focusing on it a little too hard…

But I’m trying to learn, to give myself more opportunities. In the first night that I sat with Aaron and Mary-Beth, I learned many things, like I am saying words wrong. I think that Cued Speech would be very helpful in all speech therapy classes, especially for those who are dhh… because it shows things at a phonemic level, words that sound the same to a person who is dhh, may actually have different phonemes, such as a and ate commonly sound the same to me. With Cued Speech, I will be able to tell the difference between them. “A” would be cued 5C-5T (5 Hand position from the chin to the throat) while “ate” would be 5C-5T 5S (5 Hand position from the chin to the throat then a 5 on the side). Words that are hard to say, such as seven, would also be easier to learn to say if you have the phonemes mastered in other words.

Learning Cued Speech is going to take me a while, with lots of patience, lots of mistakes, and lots of practice. But, it’s a journey I’m willing to take, and something I am looking forward to. Never stop learning… and that’s what I’m trying to do.

If you are interested in learning more about Cued Speech, click on the picture above, it will take you to the National Cued Speech Association or Visit Aarons Blog posted above.